CARGO STOWAGE PLAN

Advertisements

. SAFETY OF SHIP & CREW

The utmost consideration given for the stowage plan is for the safety of ship and crew. This implies that the cargo is placed with due regard to the stability characteristic of the ship, Shearing  force & bending moment should be within acceptable limit, having  regard to the intended voyage & weather condition expected en-route.( GM is reduced, FSM, lashing of dk cargo, Void space)

Furthermore ship must not exceed permissible loa-dline mark at anytime during the voyage , pre planning and calculation will have to be carried out to achieve this.

Cargo distribution will be done in such manner that adequate working space is available to gain access for the crew & for navigation duty, for securing the ship for high seas ( access to, Sounding pipe, operating machinery, W/T doors, etc)

CODE OF SAFE WORKING PRACTICES FOR THE SAFETY OF MERCHANT SEAMEN is the guidelines to be followed to establish safe working practice on board.

Guidelines given are:

General precautions on cargo handling;

Safe working procedure;

Operating of winches,cranes, derricks & other mechanical equipment used for cargo operation;

  1. SAFETY OF CARGO ITSELF

Damage to the cargo is a serious issue. Precautionary measures are taken to avoid cargo damage while loading / unloading.

Following are to be avoided:

Inadequate stowage;

Uneven distribution;

Incorrect  slinging

Careless operation of cargo gear( Bang, crushing damage, hook damage, etc);

Carelessly packed unit , for fragile cargo( pallet);

Insufficient dunnaging;

Cargo contamination; damage due to lack of ventilation:

Absence of marking or labelling; IMDG cargo;

Improper refrigeration( control of temperature);

Particular attention is to be given for tainted cargo which may contaminate adjacent cargo;

Remember claims for the damage cargo is high. Proper record of damage cargo is to be maintained , if possible to be rejected.

  1. THE STOWAGE OF CARGO

Proper & careful stow of cargo to be done for speedy & smooth cargo operation.

Proper segregation of stow is to be planned to avoid over-stow; so that cargo is loaded as per port of rotation.

If possible distribution of cargo to be such that minimum no. of hold is used for the same consignment of cargo, this will reduce working hour, manpower & operating cost.

Pilferage of cargo to be avoided,( locker, )

 

  1. DURING VOYAGE

Certain cargo needs specific attention during voyage. During long voyage where the vessel would pass through different latitudes having different climatic condition, daily monitoring of cargo parameters are recorded & a copy is handed over to receiver upon demand.

Temperature, control, proper ventilation, heating,  inerting, gasfreeing)

  1. CHECKLIST

A comprehensive checklist when prepared would benefit the routine working procedure involving cargo work.

Checklists are ship-specific & is prepared as per the ISM code guidelines.

  1. MATE’S RECEIPT / LOG BOOK

When a consignment of cargo is received on board & stowed a RECEIPT ( by cargo officer)for that cargo is issued to shipper. This will be the prima-facie document while mentioning cargo quantity in B/L.

MATE’S LOG BOOK – This is a record of everything pertaining to cargowork; whether the ship is at sea or in Port.

Details of cargo working  will be recorded,( voyage, date, port, terminal Load, time, draft, cargo details, stevedore information, damage if any, delay,etc)

  1. CARGO PLAN

Points to reflect on cargo plan are:

Accurate cargo figure( i.e. vol. weight, unit, size,) port wise

Distribution of all package

Plan should be as per scale.

Different colour code as per port of rotation.

Where possible deck-wise bird’s eye view & side elevation of cargo spaces.

Cargo stowage plan for general cargo ships

What is a cargo plan 

A ship’s cargo plan shows the distribution as well as the disposition of all parcels of cargo aboard the vessel. The plan is formulated usually from the workbooks of the ‘deck officers’, a fair copy being produced before departure from the final port of loading. This allows copies of the plan to be made before the vessel sails. The copies are forwarded to agents at ports of discharge to allow the booking and reservation of labour, as appropriate.

It is important to plan in advance, both at the shore terminal and offshore to aid effective cargo securing. The objective of pre-planning is the safe and practical restraint of cargo carried on the deck of offshore support vessels so that personnel, ship and cargo may be reasonably protected at all stages of carriage, and during cargo operations offshore.

Cargo stowage plan for general cargo ships

What is a cargo plan 

A ship’s cargo plan shows the distribution as well as the disposition of all parcels of cargo aboard the vessel. The plan is formulated usually from the workbooks of the ‘deck officers’, a fair copy being produced before departure from the final port of loading. This allows copies of the plan to be made before the vessel sails. The copies are forwarded to agents at ports of discharge to allow the booking and reservation of labour, as appropriate.

It is important to plan in advance, both at the shore terminal and offshore to aid effective cargo securing. The objective of pre-planning is the safe and practical restraint of cargo carried on the deck of offshore support vessels so that personnel, ship and cargo may be reasonably protected at all stages of carriage, and during cargo operations offshore.

The cargo plan should include relevant details of cargoes, i.e. total quantity, description of package, bales, pallets etc., tonnage, port of discharge, identification marks and special features if and when separated. The port of discharge is normally ‘highlighted’ in one specific colour, reducing the likelihood of a parcel of cargo being over-carried to the next port. Cargoes which may have an optional port of discharge are often double-coloured to the requirements of both ports.

Additional information, such as the following, generally appears on most plans:

i) Name of the vessel.

ii) Name of the Master.

iii) List of loading ports.

iv) List of discharging ports, in order of call.

v) Sailing draughts.

vi) Tonnage load breakdown.

The cargo plan should include relevant details of cargoes, i.e. total quantity, description of package, bales, pallets etc., tonnage, port of discharge, identification marks and special features if and when separated. The port of discharge is normally ‘highlighted’ in one specific colour, reducing the likelihood of a parcel of cargo being over-carried to the next port. Cargoes which may have an optional port of discharge are often double-coloured to the requirements of both ports.

Additional information, such as the following, generally appears on most plans:

i) Name of the vessel.

ii) Name of the Master.

iii) List of loading ports.

iv) List of discharging ports, in order of call.

v) Sailing draughts.

vi) Tonnage load breakdown.

vii) Hatch tonnage breakdown.

viii) Voyage number.

ix) Total volume of empty space remaining.

x) List of dangerous cargo, if any.

xi) List of special cargo, if any.

xii) Statement of deadweight, fuel, stores, water etc.

xiii) Details of cargo separations.

xiv) Recommended temperatures for the carriage of various goods.

xv) Chief officer’s signature.