Port state control Inspection

• Practically it is not very simple to define a substandard ship solely by reference to a list of qualifying defects.
• The Surveyor has to exercise his professional judgment to determine whether the ship is to be detained until the deficiencies are corrected or allowed to sail with certain deficiencies which are not vital to the safety of the ship, its crew or passengers, having regard to the particular circumstances of the intended voyage.

• Parties may undertake an inspection based on their initiative or at the
the request of, or on the basis of information provided regarding a substandard ship by another party, professional body, port authorities or even a member of the crew of the ship. The Surveyor boards the ship and after introduction to the Master proceeds to examine the various certificates regarding their validity, annual endorsements and any outstanding deficiencies or condition of class.

• The Surveyor ensures, that various provisions stated in the IMO Conventions regulations are maintained up-to-date and in case of any defect, he may not allow the ship to sail till the deficiencies are corrected.
• In the event of a dispute, the onus of providing that undue delay was not caused rests with the Port State is Administration. In case intervention by Port State is necessary and the vessel is detained due to serious deficiencies the Administration is required to inform the Embassy/Consulate of the Flag State and Classification Society with which the vessel is classed.

• In due course this information along with a list of deficiencies is also to
be conveyed to the International Maritime Organization for further
action.
• IMO, in turn, scrutinizes the Information and forward the same to the
concerned Flag State for removing deficiencies in future.
• The report received from the Maritime authorities around the world
regarding Indian vessels are checked by the Maritime Administration
of the country and suitable steps are taken up to improve the overall
deficiency of the ship in consultation with the respective shipping
companies.

More detailed inspection

• A more detailed inspection will be carried out whenever there are clear grounds for believing, during an inspection, that the condition of the ship or of it’s equipment or crew does not substantially meet the relevant requirements of a relevant instrument.
• Clear grounds exist when a Port State Control Officer finds evidence, which in his/her professional judgement warrants a more detailed inspection of the ship, its equipment or its crew.
• The absence of valid certificates or documents is considered a clear ground.

Detailed Inspection port state control .

Detailed Inspection port state control .